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Trust FKaUK to make the totally wrong choice!

The FK(a)UK’s Brexit hara-kiri tour October 2019 – stage one

A short visit to Estonia, Finland and Lithuania demonstrates that mid-size places places with a sensible identity – whether Lithuania or Lombardy; Estonia or Extremadura; Greater Helsinki or Hesse – offer a type of “right” scale and potentially the right culture for being the major intermediary mediator of global and local challenges. They are likely to be far more effective than large nation states with their own exceptionalism of delusional global ambitions based on race and (in our case Etonian) entitlement.

One class in Eton providing two of the three worst UK PMs in modern times

The Old Etonian revulsion of the last dark days of the UK…

There is little pleasure in this blog having anticipated the end of representative democracy as a credible system of political leadership and governance, in the face of the far right coup whose current face is de Pfeffel Johnson, resulting in the UK as a deeply dark failed state. It is worth providing a summary of where we are, though, as the resistance tries to launch a turnaround from the crisis…

UK will be passing Kiribati as we are submerged in our own Brexit bile

Understanding Brexit, and where to experience it if we leave the EU on 29th March 2019…

Brexit is a ‘coup’, a ‘virus’ and a ‘fiasco’ of an by a new type of advanced, relatively wealthy ‘failing state’. Kiribati provides a particularly poignant place from which to view it if it goes ahead on 29th March 2019.

Proud to betray the Daily Mail’s “will of the people”

On the second anniversary of the UK’s greatest day of shame, I shall be doing something I haven’t done for decades – taking part in a political march to Parliament. That I am joining the “March for a People’s Vote” is a far from perfect representation of my views on Brexit. For one thing, if

Nissan, CETA, Heathrow and the BREXIT virus…

I hate to start a piece with a cliche, but ‘we live in extraordinary times’. With a rampant BREXIT virus it is almost impossible to make any sense of the feverish narratives of post-referendum Britain. This piece considers three ‘decisions’ last week – the Nissan announcement of new investment in Sunderland; the signing of the